ULA Fall Workshop 2020

The annual Fall Workshop was held September 25th. Our virtual event included two author keynotes, ten breakout session choices, and countless ideas from librarians throughout the state. Click on the session links or video button below for on-demand recordings.

Christian McKay Heidicker┃Christian reads and writes and drinks tea. Between his demon-hunting cat and his fiddling, red-headed fiancée, he feels completely protected from evil spirits. Christian is the author of the Newbery Honor-winning Scary Stories for Young FoxesThieves of Weirdwood, Cure for the Common Universe, and Attack of the 50 Foot Wallflower. He lives in Salt Lake City, Utah. cmheidicker.com

Rebecca West: Alphabet Soup—Serving LGBTQ+ Teens (Video Coming Soon)┃At the Salt Lake City Public Library we are committed to providing LGBTQ+ teens with a safe and inclusive space to present their true selves. We have created a library-facilitated Gender and Sexuality Alliance for teens called Alphabet Soup. We will discuss what Alphabet Soup does and how we work together to expand our definition of inclusion and belonging. Alphabet Soup differs from school-organized GSAs in a variety of ways. Many of our teens are not enrolled in traditional schools and don’t have access to school-organized GSAs. Our GSA also gives teens the opportunity for anonymity, to create new friendships, build a support group outside of school, and to follow their passions and work on projects important to them with the support of the library’s resources and staff mentors. Utah’s public libraries can be safe havens for LGBTQ+ teens through community-led GSA initiatives.

Andrea Payant & Nick Gittins: How We Lived—Grant Bulltail & Crow Nation Digital Collection┃Utah State University was selected to host a unique collection of oral histories from Grant Bulltail, Crow Storyteller and 2019 NEA National Heritage Fellow, representing the stories and knowledge of the Crow Nation as passed down by his ancestors. The collection spans 20+ years of field work and collaboration across library departments and regional partners. Join us to learn about the collection as well as USU’s connection to the material and our journey working with Grant and the Crow Nation to ensure the final online presence is representative of their culture.

Robert Nelson: Podcasting Services at the Marriott Library┃The Marriott Library, at the University of Utah, has a professional audio studio for digital curricular development. The Audio Studio has been in service since 2009. The emerging trend of usage has seen in explosion in podcast creation. The Audio Studio allows for a large, soundproof space using professional audio microphones recording on a digital recorder. The Author, who manages the Audio Studio, has been podcasting since before there was a term for the episodic medium with over two and a quarter million minutes listened from 2013 to the present. This presentation describes the Audio Studio space for podcast facilitation and discusses how students, faculty, and staff use podcasts for different purposes.

Cristina Reyes: Developing Inclusive Attitude Competencies & Implicit Bias Awareness┃The purpose of this training is to provide an understanding of diversity, inclusion, and implicit bias by providing definitions and context. The session will be divided among 3-4 speakers each addressing a different facet of the main points. Each speaker will demonstrate with an example what inclusive attitudes and language looks like when interacting with users in different libraries and allow for questions and comments from the audience. Lastly, each speaker will provide some simple strategies library professionals can take away from the session and apply to their efforts for correcting their own their unconscious bias and developing inclusive attitude competencies.

Katherine Coles┃Distinguished Professor of English & Poet in Residence, University of Utah. Katharine’s fifth poetry collection, The Earth Is Not Flat (Red Hen 2013), was written under the auspices of the U.S. National Science Foundation’s Antarctic Artists and Writers Program. Ten poems from the book, translated into German by Klaus Martens, appeared in the summer 2014 issue of the journal Matrix; she has also been translated into Spanish, Italian, and Dutch. Her chapbook, Bewilder, was published this fall by the International Poetry Studies Institute at the University of Canberra, and her sixth collection, Flight, is due out from Red Hen in 2016. She is also the co-PI on the Poemage project, which develops software for analyzing and visualizing sonic relationships in poetry; she has written a number of scholarly articles and presentations based on this work. A professor at the University of Utah, she served from 2006 to 2012 as Utah Poet Laureate and in 2009 and 2010 as the inaugural director of the Poetry Foundation’s Harriet Monroe Poetry Institute. She has received grants and awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Guggenheim Foundation.

Kirsten Nilsson: The Nuts and Bolts of Building an Inclusive Children’s Library Collection┃Students need to find books in our libraries that act as “windows, mirrors and sliding doors.” This session will explore how to conduct a “diversity audit” of our children’s collections; suggestions for finding balanced book reviews and reliable book lists to diversify our collection; identifying and avoiding cultural tropes and stereotypes in picture books and middle readers; “including” rather than “othering” in our own book talks; the value of “own voices” authors; and a plethora of inclusive book recommendations.

Miranda Kispert: Imagery& Access—Using Visual Signage to Improve Resource Discovery┃One of the hardest groups of library users to help effectively are those that don’t ask for help. They may have a visual or
cognitive challenge, face a language barrier, be unfamiliar with call
numbers, or simply feel ashamed to ask for assistance. Using logos for
visual, low-text signage may be a way to help your users locate resources,
find areas to browse, and navigate the library. Learn how our library
approached the task of designing signage to improve the library’s
navigability and wayfinding, and worked to ensure equity of access for all
users via the application of universal design elements. We will walk you
through our process and the research behind it to get you started on the
path to a more discoverable collection.

Allie McCormack: Beyond Books—Cataloging Archival Materials, Pt. 1┃Academic libraries aren’t the only institutions that care for archival materials. These unique items can often be found in public libraries, historical societies, and other cultural heritage organizations, many of which may not have trained special collections catalogers on staff. In this workshop, participants will learn how to catalog archival materials, including manuscripts, photographs, and audiovisual materials, so they can be discovered in online catalogs and databases. Both item and
collection-level cataloging will be discussed, and participants will learn when and how to apply relevant metadata standards like RDA and DACS. They will then practice cataloging with examples provided by the instructors. [Presentation Slides] [AMREMM] [DCRM(MSS)] [BSR]

Katie Strand: Facilitating Diversity & Inclusion Conversations┃We all want to build inclusive spaces and experiences for our libraries and our users, but how do we begin? Being intentional about leading vulnerable discussions with our colleagues presents us with unique opportunities to share our experiences and learn about equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI). However, these conversations can often be emotional minefields. How do we work past the discomfort and get to solutions that will improve our workplace and our libraries? This interactive workshop will lead participants in a conversation of challenges, opportunities, and questions that Utah librarians face with EDI efforts. While the presenters will model facilitation and offer tips and best practices, they are not EDI experts, but rather fellow explorers on this path.

Wendy Annas: Aware AF—Mental Health Resources & Classes┃Come get information about developing regular mental health awareness classes for teens and adults and expanding your book collection on mental health related topics. We’ll include how to collaborate with local therapists, some possible grant opportunities for funding, and the classes and book lists we started our program with. Our program was desperately needed and it has been gratifying to see how it has impacted our patrons.

Ben Nielsen: Lights, Camera, Action, Opportunities (and Challenges) in Providing a Recording Studio in Your Library┃The BYU Library opened a video production studio in 2015, and Provo City Library opened the Basement Creative Lab in 2018. Both are spaces where patrons can create video and audio content using library provided equipment. We want to talk with you about what we have learned so far in this journey, what creative opportunities come from a studio space in the library, and what challenges it presents. Our discussion will have perspectives from both a public and an academic library, so there will be something for everyone!

Allie McCormack: Beyond Books—Cataloging Archival Materials, Pt. 2┃Academic libraries aren’t the only institutions that care for archival materials. These unique items can often be found in public libraries, historical societies, and other cultural heritage organizations, many of which may not have trained special collections catalogers on staff. In this workshop, participants will learn how to catalog archival materials, including manuscripts, photographs, and audiovisual materials, so they can be discovered in online catalogs and databases. Both item and collection-level cataloging will be discussed, and participants will learn when and how to apply relevant metadata standards like RDA and DACS. They will then practice cataloging with examples provided by the instructors. [Presentation Slides] [AMREMM] [DCRM(MSS)] [BSR]