Cancellation of ULA 2020 Conference

Dear ULA Members,

It is with great regret that the Board announces the cancellation of the 2020 Annual ULA Conference that was to be held in St. George May 13-15, 2020. This difficult decision was made due to the sweeping concerns and travel moratoriums due to the Coronavirus that went in place by various organizations, including government and library entities across the state in the last few days. Some of these moratoriums are announced to last up until the scheduled conference dates. The board had an emergency session today and determined it was in the best financial interest of the association in the face of uncertain circumstances out of the board’s control to make the cancellation now while the costs that must be absorbed are lower than to have a conference that very likely few will be able to attend. The board also investigated the possibility of postponing the conference to this fall, but took into consideration that many librarians from our variety of institutions struggle to travel during that season for a multi-day conference away from home. The venues and lodging were also very tight on availability due to other conferences planned during that season.

In the coming days plans will be made to refund registration fees and sponsorship donations. We will send out more information to those affected. The board is also looking at how to make the Fall Workshop on September 25, 2020 a unique event this year.

We thank you for your support of the Utah Library Association and sincerely apologize for this loss. Our next annual conference will be the combined Mountain Plains Library Association/Utah Library Association Conference May 19-21, 2021 in Sandy.

Very respectfully,

Vern Waters, ULA President
Daniel Mauchley, ULA President-Elect

ULA Conference T-Shirts

The ULA Conference Planning Committee is ordering conference t-shirts highlighting this year’s awesome “In Libraries We Trust” logo. Make your order by April 8th so your t-shirt will be ready for the ULA Conference. T-shirts are available in either regular or fitted styles and cost between $20 and $26 (depending on size). Place your order on the ULA Conference website. Any revenue from these t-shirts will be added to the ULA scholarship fund.

Save the Date – ULA Fall Workshop

ULA Fall Workshop

Friday, September 30, 2016

Grand County Library

Moab, Utah

Theme:  Libraries: “Archway to the Future”

 

Session topics will include advocacy, State Library offerings, health & wellness resources, and others TBD.  The luncheon speaker will be Roy Webb from the University of Utah, a river running specialist and author.  More details to come.  Please save the date and plan to join us for a great time in scenic Southeast Utah.

2016 Conference: Keep on Learning

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By: Dustin Fife

ULA Past-President

Annual conference has come and gone. I had an incredible experience because of all of you. I want to express gratitude to everyone who helped plan and execute the conference, and to everyone who presented. The annual conference is one of the best ways to share information and make all our libraries better. Conferences also always help me rejuvenate and prepare for the future. Once again, thank you to all who participated.

We now have several ways to help the learning continue, for those who attended and those who could not. First of all, using the conference hashtag (#ula2016) we have pulled all of the conference tweets and Instagram posts together into one feed using Storify. See what everyone was saying throughout the conference here:

ULA Conference Storify

We are also posting presentations through the online scheduling tool Sched.org. You can find the program here:

Conference Program

If you click on individual presentations such as this one, you can then find links to the individual presentations, just like this.

One of the most important things that you can do to continue the learning though, is to help us collect feedback so that we can make future conferences better. Please fill out the conference survey here:

Conference Survey

Once more, thank you to all who participated. I am excited to see the incredible things that will come from our new ULA President Jami Carter and President-Elect Dan Compton.

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Failure is definitely an option (not to mention inevitable)

StrikethroughHeader-1By: Pamela Martin, Utah Library Association Past-President and Idaho Resident

Are you allowed to fail at work?

While it’s probably not great to continually fail at work, failure is an unavoidable part of work, and it should be welcome. Failure teaches us what we are doing wrong and challenges us to be better. As a reference and instruction librarian, I expect my students to be aware of this. I try to teach my students that failure is just part of research – that you actually learn to search better as you fail at searches. In the databases, seemingly perfect keywords will fail you, and titles that seem pertinent will disguise useless, irrelevant information.  Researching is a process of trial and error that can all too often be a little heavy on the errors. However, even if students believe me, they don’t like coming to terms with this truth.

And why should they? None of us enjoy failing. While this is particularly true in the workplace, fear of failure is also heightened online, where we post our successes and hide our flaws. Social media can be a powerful sharing tool; however, all we can really share is a small part of our true experience. And if the partial reality reflected in social media is often deceptively rosy, so, too, is the reality portrayed at most professional conferences. At library conferences, our best and brightest discuss their shiniest successes. While this kind of event can be inspiring, it can also be demoralizing. Often we listen to stories of success that seem too far out of reach or aren’t replicable at our institutions. Presenters often don’t mention the many failures along the way, or if they do these failures are seen as trivial obstacles, barely worth mentioning.

That’s why I’m excited to attend Strikethrough, ULA’s failure workshop. If we expect our students to embrace failure, we must do the same. We need to allow (encourage?) failure in the workplace. Failure can teach us as much as – if not more than – tales of success. I believe by demystifying failure within librarianship we can encourage innovation and enjoy more success.